Osteoprosis Statistics Florida

Osteoporosis Statistics Florida

Are you living in Florida and worried about osteoporosis? Then, you might be surprised that osteoporosis statistics Florida indicate that people living down South often have significant risk of vitamin d deficiency and need their physician to monitor their vitamin D status. 

Why Do Women Underestimate Their Osteoporosis Risk? 

According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation there are several very important reasons:

  • “About 3 in 10 postmenopausal women (31 percent with osteoporosis and 27 percent without) incorrectly believe that “drinking milk or taking calcium supplements alone will prevent osteoporosis fractures/breaks.
  • About one-quarter (24 percent) of postmenopausal women incorrectly believe there is no way to build new bone at their age.
  • Three in 10 (30 percent) postmenopausal women with osteoporosis mistakenly believe the risk of a fracture/break cannot be reduced in women their age.
  • Of postmenopausal women who have had a fracture from a standing position or less, only 13 percent of those with osteoporosis and 2 percent not diagnosed recognized that it may be related to bone health.
  • Only one-third (32 percent) of postmenopausal women who have risk factors for developing osteoporosis actually realize or believe they are at risk.
  • Approximately two-thirds of postmenopausal women (even those diagnosed with osteoporosis and those at high risk for osteoporosis) were more likely to be concerned with other conditions, such as stroke (67 percent), heart attack (67 percent), and breast cancer (65 percent) than osteoporosis (56 percent), even though more women over the age of 55 are hospitalized every year in the U.S. for osteoporosis-related fractures than for heart attacks, breast cancer, or strokes.
  • Of postmenopausal women, 43 percent with osteoporosis and 44 percent without thought clumsiness caused their most recent fracture after falling from a standing position or less, without recognizing that it is not normal to break a bone from these types of falls.”

Why this matters: Without realizing their own risk women will not start to strengthen their bones and thus prevent potential fractures.

Misdiagnosis Statistics  of Osteoporosis

  • “Research suggests only 2 in 10 older women in the U.S. who suffer from a fracture are tested or treated for osteoporosis.
  • 96 percent of postmenopausal women who say they have not been diagnosed with osteoporosis and have experienced a fracture/break from falling from a standing position or less were not told by their doctor it could be linked to osteoporosis.
  • One-third (33 percent) of postmenopausal women in the survey with a fracture from falling from a standing position or less were not referred for follow-up visits.”

Why this matters: Fracture prevention needs better monitoring and care. Women’s health needs to focus more on prevention of serious fractures and encourage women to work on bone health.

Vitamin D and Osteoporosis Connection

“There is increasing evidence that vitamin D may have other nonskeletal effects. Several clinical trials have demonstrated that vitamin D may improve muscular strength and result in the reduction of falls.

Several studies have revealed that there is also an alarmingly high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a lower latitude of the United States. One study, by Levis et al, found the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in an ambulatory population of men and women in Miami, Florida (25° N) to be 38–40% at the end of winter.8 A study examining the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in North America in women receiving osteoporosis therapy found a prevalence of vitamin D deficiency of 18% in the early winter months. There was no significant difference in the prevalence rate of vitamin D deficiency when three different latitudes were compared >42°, 35 to 42° and <35° N.” (Source: South Med J)

Why this matters: physicians should recommend and encourage vitamin D supplementation in patients who do not have adequate sunlight exposure or already have low bone mass.”

Osteoporosis Statistics Florida – Annual Fracture Rates

 Annual fracture incidence rates per 10,000 Florida women, by age and race group and fracture type

RaceFractureAge (years)
50–6465–7475–84≥85
Unadj.*Adj.Unadj.*Adj.Unadj.*Adj.Unadj.*Adj.
White‡Hip§8.77.036.532.8131.3118.2391.2371.6
Spine??59.347.4166.2149.6309.2278.2447.0424.7
Wrist¶48.734.160.642.453.337.368.855.1
Black‡Hip§3.82.517.514.055.544.4164.9156.6
Spine??57.937.7161.2129.0306.2245.0447.0402.3
Wrist¶48.026.459.635.753.231.968.848.2
Hispanic♯Hip§4.93.825.322.6115.1103.0330.6314.1
Spine??59.246.9162.4145.4307.9276.1447.0424.0
Wrist¶48.733.759.841.653.237.168.854.9
Other‡Hip§16.812.645.038.3369.5314.11268.31204.8
Spine??56.342.2160.4136.4303.9258.3447.0424.7
Wrist¶47.028.259.441.653.037.168.848.2

Source: Methodology for Estimating Current and Future Burden of Osteoporosis in State Populations: Application to Florida in 2000 through 2025

Why this matters: Especially the risk for hip fractures is extremely high the older we get. A hip fracture will lead to high care and a loss in independence!

Osteoporosis Risk is 2.5 Higher for Hispanics In Florida

Osteoporosis costs are staggering and are estimated to grow from $1.24 billion in 2000 to $2.14 billion in 2025. Furthermore, osteoporosis statistics Florida tell us that costs of osteoporotic fractures in Hispanic persons are projected to increase 2.5‐fold. This means that culturally appropriate interventions may be valuable in preventing a dramatic increase in osteoporosis in Hispanic persons. 

Why this matters: Public Health might want to consider addressing potential risk groups more strategically.

Osteoporosis Statistics Florida – Hospital Admissions and Length of Stay

Osteoporotic hip fractures resulted in approximately 68% of admissions, spine fractures in 12%, wrist fractures in 3%, and other fractures in 17%

FracturetypeNumber ofhospitaladmissionsHospital costs ($)Length of stay (days)Dischargesto LTCfacility (%)
MeanSDTotalMeanSDTotal
Hip21,82720,61414,699447,782,2675.94.8127,51261
Spine3,9918,9925,80635,707,6264.72.918,74342
Wrist1,04412,1366,12112,522,0022.91.7 3,02424
Other5,39414,70710,00077,952,6504.33.323,53638
Total32,25517,38323,677573,964,5455.25.7172,81454

Mean and total gross charges, hospital days, and percentage discharged to LTC for osteoporotic fractures in men and women aged 50 years and older, admitted to Florida hospitals during 1998 *

Why this matters:  Knowing data helps you to prevent and manage your risks. 

Is There Any Good News?

There certainly is! It’s never too late to do something to improve bone health and to stop osteoporosis in its tracks. Beside talking to your physician to establish the treatment plan that is best for you your  goal should be to maintain good bone health to ensure a low risk of fracture. 

Best Science Backed Tips to Improve Osteoporosis 

Consider Purchase a PEMF Home Device

Studies show that pulsed electromagnetic field therapy is beneficial in strengthening bone health. Therefore purchasing a pemf home device could be a great step towards prevention of fractures and more life quality due to better health.

Start Bone Strengthening Exercise

According to the National  Osteoporosis Foundation “there are two types of osteoporosis exercises that are important for building and maintaining bone density: weight-bearing and muscle-strengthening exercises.” For more detailed exercises click here. The foundation also recommends “strengthening the muscles that hold the spine straight and upright. These muscles run up and down the back and sides of your spine. They are called your erector spinae muscles.” 

Improve Your Nutrition

Here is the food recommendation list of the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

Good-for-Your-Bones Foods

FOODNUTRIENT
Dairy products such as low-fat and non-fat milk, yogurt and cheeseCalcium. Some dairy products are fortified with Vitamin D.
Fish
Canned sardines and salmon (with bones)Calcium
Fatty varieties such as salmon, mackerel, tuna and sardinesVitamin D
Fruits and vegetables
Collard greens, turnip greens, kale, okra, Chinese cabbage, dandelion greens, mustard greens and broccoli.Calcium
Spinach, beet greens, okra, tomato products, artichokes, plantains, potatoes, sweet potatoes, collard greens and raisins.Magnesium
Tomato products, raisins, potatoes, spinach, sweet potatoes, papaya, oranges, orange juice, bananas, plantains and prunes.Potassium
Red peppers, green peppers, oranges, grapefruits, broccoli, strawberries, brussels sprouts, papaya and pineapples.Vitamin C
Dark green leafy vegetables such as kale, collard greens, spinach, mustard greens, turnip greens and brussel sprouts.Vitamin K
Fortified Foods
Calcium and vitamin D are sometimes added to certain brands of juices, breakfast foods, soy milk, rice milk, cereals, snacks and breads.Calcium, Vitamin D

Eat Dried Plums

According to the Florida State University eating dried plums helps with bone health. “Don’t wait until you get a fracture or you are diagnosed with osteoporosis and have to have prescribed medicine,” Arjmandi said. “Do something meaningful and practical beforehand. People could start eating two to three dried plums per day and increase gradually to perhaps six to 10 per day. Prunes can be eaten in all forms and can be included in a variety of recipes.

Arjmandi and a group of researchers from Florida State and Oklahoma State University tested two groups of postmenopausal women. Over a 12-month period, the first group, consisting of 55 women, was instructed to consume 100 grams of dried plums (about 10 prunes) each day, while the second — a comparative control group of 45 women — was told to consume 100 grams of dried apples. All of the study’s participants also received daily doses of calcium (500 milligrams) and vitamin D (400 international units).

The group that consumed dried plums had significantly higher bone mineral density in the ulna (one of two long bones in the forearm) and spine, in comparison with the group that ate dried apples. This, according to Arjmandi, was due in part to the ability of dried plums to suppress the rate of bone resorption, or the breakdown of bone, which tends to exceed the rate of new bone growth as people age.”

A Word From healthylifestyleflorida.com

Osteoporosis Statistics Florida are a warning signal and hope at the same time. All women need to put more emphasis on their bone health and request better medical monitoring to prevent serious fractures and thus a huge decrease in life quality and extensive costs.

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